Antonia Luxem

Antonia Luxem

What’s your background?

I was lucky to live in many different countries around the world, and have therefore spent the majority of my life as a traveller and explorer. Before inspiring me and teaching me to become an artist, London gave me an education in human rights and environmental law.

What influences you artistically?

I read and listen to a great deal of music. These two art forms really help me switch off and explore new dimensions.

How do you start a new work?

I’m usually reading something on a particular subject-matter, like a book or an essay, and then new ideas and possibilities start mushrooming and I start writing.

What are you working on right now?

I’ve been working on my next film for over a year now, which I’ll be shooting with an amazing crew at the end of February. It’s a really exciting new project that’s taking my work in a slightly new direction. It’s about the dreamlike journey of a queer woman through a strange universe where she encounters a number of puzzling characters, who are kind of archetypes of our society. The confrontation with these archetypes lead her further and further in her quest, until she meets a group of beguiling circus performers and magicians who show her a new and exciting way of life…

Antonia Luxem’s portfolio →

Katie Goodwin

Katie Goodwin

What’s your background?

I’m from a big family brought up by my mum mostly on her own who has encouraged me in her own way to pursue my art. I was always into painting, photography and all kinds of films. I came to London to do BA Fine Art when I was young and not very confident and gave up painting and I made a few videos some of which I still like but the whole process made me not like art so much. So for a while I went off to work as a video editor and ended up working in the film visual effects industry in Australia. The hours were insane but I saved up and started making art again and so eventually I came back to London. And art. And got a studio. And this time with a lot more life experience and a drive full of very cool footage and lots of ideas enrolled in an MA Fine Art and was really blessed with my cohort that year.

What influences you artistically?

Cinema, writers and thinkers, architecture, scientific discoveries, astronomy. And although I don’t want it to a certain unease with politics and the world happenings of late.

How do you start a new work?

I usually find an image or read an interesting article or paragraph or find a special discarded object or I meet someone and a conversation sparks an idea. I have a little notebook for ideas. Most never go anywhere. And usually whilst in the midst of one project, another branches off and I have to put that part on hold until I’ve finished the first. Or the second branch becomes bigger and better and more significant and I drop the first. But generally I let everything grow quite organically. Even with the film shoot. Just plan where I’m going and then find my way. The edit is where everything comes together like cooking, throw all the ingredients together, give it a stir and try and make some sense out of it.

What are you working on right now?

I’m working on a pseudo meditation 3D animation utilising some fancy softwares I learnt over the first lockdown. It’s going to have some political overtones in the voiceover which I’m scripting right now but look and sound wise it’s going to be hypnotic.

And another animation work for an exhibition next year about waiting—something we’re all doing a lot of lately. The work is going to be set in a train station where trains pass through but never stop. It’s not going to be very long but it will probably be on eternal loop.

Katie Goodwin’s portfolio →

Matthew Burdis

Matthew Burdis

What’s your background?

I was born in Newcastle upon Tyne in 1993. I initially began making and studying sculpture and then moved into video and film.

What influences you artistically?

I find myself being more and more influenced by reading than anything else: a mix between fiction and autobiographical writing.

How do you start a new work?

My work usually begins with a specific place: either one which I have visited physically or experienced in a removed capacity, such as in a film or a photograph. I initially build around either an image and / or an object from this location.

What are you working on right now?

I am currently making a work that exists as both a film and as a performance called Interior (The Spectator). This work has come out of working for the then studio and now estate of the painter Howard Hodgkin. The first memory I have of Howard is from twelve years ago, when I was fifteen years old on an annual school trip to Tate Britain, where I saw his painting Clean Sheets. It is the only work I can recall from that trip. The painting is a lot bigger than I remember it, the composition and colours remain the same.

My next encounter would be nine years later when I began working at his home and studio in January 2017, at the same time Howard was in India painting. Whilst he was in India, giving past memories a physical form, I was in his home, archiving and itemising those that had already found a tangible existence. As I awaited his return home, I listened to interviews of him as I logged the thousands of analogue photographs in his library, directly beneath his studio. His voice in my ears and his still image in my hands.

Almost immediately on his return home, Howard Hodgkin died, aged eighty-four on March 9, 2017. The anticipation of meeting him is a feeling that still persists. Interior (The Spectator) is built up of hundreds of still images, all but two of which were taken by myself, accompanied by a narration of musings and thoughts. That said, it is not so much about Howard Hodgkin, but around ideas concerning personal and collective memory, around knowing those we have never met. At a time when so many of us follow or look into the lives of others, I find myself thinking about what identity means now and how an object or an image can represent this.

Matthew Burdis’ portfolio →

Tessa Garland

Tessa Garland

What’s your background?

I spent the early part of my life beside the sea in Cornwall, South West England. I went to Falmouth School of Art then then to Newcastle to study a Fine Art BA in sculpture. After art college I travelled and lived in many cities around the world. In 2002 I moved to London, mainly because of the brilliant access to art it offers. I am based in East London, which I love because of its diversity and the numerous artists who are in my life. Over the years I have watched the whole area change particularly since the London 2012 Olympics. Whole neighbourhoods have been crushed to dust and new ‘villages’ built. For many years now I have been witness to these changes.

What influences you artistically?

Banality, urban loneliness, the everyday, twilight and the way light shifts from day to night. I’m also interested in the way cities change and the politics of public and private space. Living in East London I am surrounded by new neighbourhoods where luxury flats (that are not so luxury) are marketed and sold. I have favourite locations that I return to and wait for something- a moment that interests me…this could be as simple as a lamp light coming on or the silhouette of a figure backlit in a window.

How do you start a new work?

Often through a collection of observations that I film. These recordings form into sequences and become longer works or are used as loops in sculptural works. I have created my own library of observations and have particular favourite recordings that reappear in many works. Early on in the process I will search for the right kinds of sounds to accompany the visual, audio is very important to me. I’m not musically trained have a keen ear for what is right. I’m also good at internet searches and sourcing sound that I remix and reappropriate for my own use. I’m naturally curious and like to try out new ways of working but it’s reassuring for me to return to the same piece of footage and rework it into something new. Recurring locations also allows me to fine tune my observations. I might return to a particular place up to ten times maybe more to get a single shot that I think I can use.

What are you working on right now?

It’s been very busy recently. I’ve been working alongside Sophie Hill (Nunnery Gallery Director) on the International exhibition of moving image and performance, ‘Visions in the Nunnery’, Nunnery Gallery. We showcase many brilliant artists across three programmes, each of these spans 3-4 weeks. The exhibition takes about 6 months every two years to put together. I’ve always organised exhibitions and activity and see it as going hand in hand with my own artist’s life. I’m a big believer in creating networks and being proactive. I’m grateful for the inclusion on this artist led platform, 6x6 project. I’ve already started to watch the films and have discovered so many artists who before where unknown to me. Also good to see some artists on 6x6 project that we have shown in Visions in the Nunnery too!

As far as my own personal work I am part of Visions P2 and will be showing a new work that I have been developing for quite a few months. The work in progress aptly named Chobham after the area in the Olympic Park where I have been filming people silhouetted on their balconies at twilight. It’s great to have a real physical gallery to be able to show work in, so I want to take full advantage of this particularly when so much content is now online.

Tessa Garland’s portfolio →

April Lin

April Lin 林森

What’s your background?

My background is a bit non-linear and convoluted: I studied sociology at the London School of Economics, and considered a path in academia, enamoured with the possibilities of creating knowledge that the university represented. By my third year, I had grown disenchanted by the endless hierarchies and bureaucracies, one of many students fatigued by the effects of privatisation on the UK university system. As my formal learning started to resemble that of an expensive chore, I started to work with video, a far less conscripting method of nurturing my interests. I could be emotional, loose-tongued, wandering; I didn’t have to be certain, productive, arguing my way forward. I decided to switch paths after completing a deflating research internship at a university, and did a brief stint at a documentary film Masters programme at Goldsmiths University, but didn’t feel comfortable in the genre’s attachment to factual truth claims. I kept making experimental work that played with what truth is or could be that confused people, I think. And so, I have arrived at working with moving image, where there is space for me to care about the issues I care about, in the ways I want to learn and explore and share them. As an ever-evolving person, I don’t know how long this iteration of my practice will last, but so far I am finding it more expansive and liberating than anything else I have done, which is promising and re-invigorating.

What influences you artistically?

Work that is disruptive, curious, and care-ful, that encourages us outside of obedience or passivity or neutrality. It grounds me in my own position as an artist, this comradeship of practitioners who materialise ways of being and living beyond these delineated boxes that were always destined for expiration. This doesn’t at all have to be formally recognised “artistic work”, I should say. More often than not, it is simply persons who are making expansive and envisioning work in whatever they do, perhaps even just by being. Crucial, of course, are the sociopolitical rootings — explorations need to address our contemporary structures in order to truly depart from them, or it can easily fall into erasure, or an unwitting re-looping of systems.

How do you start a new work?

I have a vague direction I want the work to move in, and then I grumble and mutter and eventually chisel a skeleton of a piece out of the haze of feelings, dreams, points of intrigue. Then I like to sprinkle something unfamiliar I have been wanting to try out — like a technique, a concept, an approach — into the process, to throw some unpredictability into it. Things take their time and rearrange themselves, before coalescing into a gut feeling that feels trustworthy and ready to be worked with.

What are you working on right now?

I am making a film for my solo exhibition at Obsidian Coast in 2021, titled
“Loving 佢 | /ˈlʌvɪŋ/ /keuih/”. It’s about how the unknown guides us towards knowing ourselves, and takes the form of an imagined exchange between two beings in separate worlds. It’s been delayed due to COVID-19, which has of course changed our relationship to labour, time, and care on a global scale. I’ve never been with a piece for so long before, and it’s quite special, feeling your relationship to each other undulate, like breathing together. I’m also about to start working on the second installment of my long-term project, “An A-Z Of Imagining A Better World”, in which I make one no-constraints, entirely-up-to-me video a year, ticking off one letter of the English alphabet at a time. I think the one for 2020 will be “C: Cry”, as this year has been one marked by grief and release, and I have found myself crying more than I can remember.

April Lin’s portfolio →

Sasha Litvintseva and Beny Wagner

Sasha Litvintseva and Beny Wagner

What’s your background?

Beny: I was born in former West Berlin and spent my childhood moving between the USA, Israel and Germany. I studied at Bard College, NY, where I started in history but switched to fine art and became a painter for a few years. After graduating I moved back to Berlin and gradually shifted my practice towards moving image and writing. In 2015 I did a year long residency at Jan van Eyck Academy in the Netherlands, after which I started teaching at Gerrit Rietveld Academy in the Netherlands. Last year I moved to London to start a PhD at the Archaeologies of Media and Technology group at Winchester School of Art.

Sasha: I was born above the polar circle in the former Soviet Union, grew up in Moscow, and have been based in London since 2004. For my BA I studied Fine Art at the Slade, where I quite quickly began making moving image works and have been doing so ever since. I received my most hands-on filmmaking training during a semester at SAIC in Chicago. Recently I finished a PhD in Media, Communications and Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, which also developed my commitment to writing as part of my practice.

What influences you artistically?

In terms of our collaboration, there are several ongoing strands. On the one hand, we’re constantly discussing the kinds of films we want to make on a formal level. This comes in response to other films we see but also from just about any kind of stimulus we encounter. On the other hand, we’re intellectually interested in how we know the world. To this end, we seek out knowledge about the labor structures, scientific developments, technological infrastructures that have informed the particular ways in which we perceive the world and ourselves within it.

How do you start a new work?

There is this general cloud of information that we’re always adding to, whether in notes, images, anecdotes, etc. Sometimes we’ll get excited about a theme we want to explore and start thinking about how this could be translated into a film. Sometimes that doesn’t at all work. Some things we’re very interested in don’t really lend themselves to film and sometimes we have to try it out in order to figure out it can’t work. The things that do work, usually happen kind of spontaneously. Like for example, with our film A Demonstration, we had actually been working on something else for about 6 months prior to that which we ended up abandoning. A Demonstration came from one sentence we read somewhere, which sparked this excitement and we worked very quickly from there.

What are you working on right now?

Right now we’re working on a film that presents 3 episodes in the history of measurement. We became very interested in the metric revolution, it’s relationship to the French revolution, how the meter was defined as a fraction of the distance from the North Pole to the equator. From there we started learning about the relationship of measurement to justice, and maybe more importantly, its use of the pretense of justice as an effective way of cheating. This project is new territory for both of us because we have a script and are collaborating with quite a few people who have skills that we don’t. So it’s a more ambitious and decentralized scale of production than we’ve ever had before.

Sasha Litvintseva and Beny Wagner’s portfolio →

Jamie Jenkinson

Jamie Jenkinson

What’s your background?

I’m from Morecambe on the north west coast of the UK.

What influences you artistically?

I’ve been heavily influenced by experimental filmmakers, like: Peter Gidal, Nicky Hamlyn, Rose Lowder, Nick Collins, Jennifer Nightingale, Cathy Rogers, Stan Brakhage, Andy Warhol; and more recently Dóra Maurer, Jonas Mekas, Marie Menken, and Josef Robakowski. But it’s almost impossible to see their films on film — even Tate exhibit them on pirated video copies — but many of these video versions are also online, so I’ve been watching more of these. I find exciting new video work more difficult to come across. My partner Amy Dickson’s keeps a progressive flow of wonderful vids; Chris Welsby has been making some new vids in a nice direction (but that are now offline); the live feed video performances of Karolina Raczynski are also really brill; and some excellent student work, they’re a real inspiration. Then there’s music, with an unparalleled experimental community, which has been a huge influence recently; Amy introducing me to a wealth of exciting happenings at Cafe OTO (who need support now more than ever). There’s also a lot of exciting and creative experimentation in skateboarding, with recent highlights like: Roman Lisivka, Joey Obrien, Trent McClung; and always Chris “Avi” Atherton. There’s also really naff stuff, like: Frasier, Jonathan Creek, Dune, Dumb and Dumber; things I grew up with that I keep coming back to. I feel like this all influences the vids one way or another, along with what I’m reading and whatever else is going on in the news etc.; but I try to keep that separate.

How do you start a new work?

I try not to think too much. Ideas are so quickly commodified. I like Vilém Flusser’s thinking, to “sacrifice of the intellect in favour of the intellect”, to go with impulses of inspired improvisation; to encourage play, experimentation, creativity; outside the limitations of commercial rationale; as is achieved in improvised music. With this in mind, I wait for something to look like it might make a nice vid. There is no guarantee with this, and it can take days, weeks, but other times it’s can be overwhelming. The smartphone lets you do that, lets anyone do that. I think it’s important we play with these machines to understand them more intuitively, how they work/think, as this is changing the way we think, and the more they use us.

What are you working on right now?

Amy and I were planning a big cycling trip in Europe for the summer to make vids, see family, and avoid London rent. Now that’s not possible I’m not sure. I’m concerned about making “isolation videos”, feeding of the crisis, but this period will inevitably be reflected in the vids, as it will for anybody making anything through this difficult time; but oddly not when using it as a subject matter, that distances from it somehow. So not sure really. I’m also still trying to finish my thesis, so should probably focus on that!

Jamie Jenkinson’s portfolio →

Rafael Guendelman Hales

Rafael Guendelman Hales

What’s your background?

I studied Art in Chile at Universidad Católica, but I always liked to work with video. There, I took some courses about film, video, and film theory. I also did the MA on Situated Practice at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, which was about the relationship between context and practices. In a way, I have been always getting into stories from the perspective of spaces, travels and chance (and very often using video and drawing).

What influences you artistically?

I feel stimulated by small stories, personal archives, and random encounters. I love to study, to research, and to dig very deep into something. Sometimes this could be misconstrued as a waste of time, sometimes is not the most “productive” way to produce something, but I feel it is just part of the process. On occasion pieces can appear very narrow and small, but behind them there is a big amount of information that is not displayed. I am also very attracted by alternative ways of thinking society; in that sense I feel very influenced by other disciplines such as ethnography, sociology or social sciences.

How do you start a new work?

As I said before, first I feel attracted by something that could be a particular story, and then I go deep into a research period. In this process, I can go searching for information in Libraries, internet, flea markets, interviewing people or in my own mind. There is always a degree of randomness in the research process; in this process I always try to leave space for non rational thinking, or for some random mental connections. In this weird equilibrium of disciplined study and random uses of time the work begins to emerge.

What are you working on right now?

I am working on a project that is an exercise in reframing the memories of my father’s family when they migrated to Israel in 1970 from Chile, escaping from the Socialist government of Allende, then returning to Chile to a regime of radical Neoliberalism in the 80’s and 90’s. There is a question around the validation of Zionism but, deeply, is a work about the questioning of our own attachments and motivations. It will lead to a video piece and an artist book that will be exhibited next year in Chile. For this I’m working with the curator Claudio Guerrero and the designer Gracia Echeverria.

Rafael Guendelman Hales’s portfolio →

Daniel & Clara

Daniel & Clara

What’s your background?

We are two humans that work as one artist, we have been working together for nine and a half years. Our collaboration began as a dialogue which within only a couple of weeks led to us starting work on a project called Savage Witches, a feature length film about the imagination, creative freedom and the possibilities of cinema as an art form. Savage Witches was the big bang of our life together, it’s when the artist Daniel & Clara was born, when our practice fused into a single entity and our path became clear. In that film can be found the seeds of every single project that we’ve made since.

We work with moving image, photography, letters and performance. Over the years our work has moved through several phases, highly impacted by where we were living and the tools we had available to us. For 6 years we lived in a small seaside town in Portugal in a dilapidated beach house where we grew our own food and kept chickens. This was an incredibly important and fruitful time for us, being in isolation enabled us to work without distraction, spending every day focused on our art and digging deeper into the workings of our imagination and creativity.

Last year we moved back to the UK and spent some wonderful months living in London, creating new work but also launching Moving Image Artists, an organisation dedicated to supporting and cultivating contemporary moving image art and experimental film. Through this we run a monthly event called the Moving Image Salon which is a space for experimental filmmakers and artists working with moving image to come together, share work and discuss their practice. This is now on hold due to the current pandemic but our online activities are still running and we have recently expanded to include the publication of an online magazine.

We are now living on Mersea Island on the Essex coast where we plan to stay until this surreal situation passes.

What influences you artistically?

We are currently interested in the relationship between inner and outer experiences of place, particularly landscapes. Our work has always given preference to interior visions, we have spent a lot of time investigating the images from our dreams and the workings of the imagination, and using these investigations to inform our practice. More recently the shift has been from a solely inward gaze to more of a dialogue between these internal images and the places we are in, an engagement we can best describe as seeing with one eye open looking out and one eye closed looking in. Particularly we’ve been exploring how we project our psyche out onto landscapes and nature, and also how in turn the natural world and environments impact on our thoughts, imagination and inner states.

The two films included here on 6x6 project are a part of these investigations. INT. LANDSCAPES was one of our first works directly approaching these subjects. It was filmed while on a journey around southern Ireland in 2017, all sound and images were recorded on location but most of the film takes place in complete darkness. Through the use of sound recordings and fleeting images interrupting darkness we seek to step beyond both documentary and fiction to exist in a third form that is simultaneously neither and both.

The second film Revisiting was created in summer 2019 and is a part of a larger ongoing project in response to Avebury stone circle in Wiltshire. Avebury has become a significant place for us, one of the key zones on the map of our projected psyche, along with the Essex salt marshes, Dungeness and the rocky beaches and hills near Hastings. We first visited Avebury in 2017 while on a tour around the UK showing our films, during the tour we shot footage for a feature film called Notes From A Journey. Revisiting is about the experience of returning to a place of a significant experience and about how the various narrative threads of past and present collide continuously.

These places speak to us, they activate imaginative thought and through our artistic engagement with creating images of them we are able to draw something out from the depths of ourselves. Fundamentally we are interested in consciousness, the experience of being a human living in a body with a mind and being conscious of it. All our work is about exploring these dimensions and seeks to expand the possibilities of being human.

How do you start a new work?

In order to be inspired we must create within ourselves the conditions for creativity and imagination to flourish. For us it is necessary to have a daily practice and a daily routine that keeps the doors to the imagination well oiled. The imagination is like a muscle and must be exercised to be at its strongest and most flexible. In addition to this one needs a craft, material forms which become containers for the imaginative material. Our work comes out of this daily discipline, the constant dialogue between us and within ourselves.

All works are born differently but there are some common stages and processes that reoccur. Being two means that the dialogue between us is continuous. The way our collaboration works is that we take no personal ownership over any ideas or activities, we both give everything we have to the projects and it then belongs to us both equally. We see ourselves as servants of creativity rather than as creator gods or masters, our duty is to listen to what creativity tells us and to follow its guidance.

What are you working on right now?

We always have several projects happening at any given time and they feed into each other, we have learnt not to force things, when we find ourselves at a standstill with one project we simply move across to one of the others and work there for a while until the obstacle fades away. It took us a while to get to grips with this, to learn to step away rather than push through, but as soon as we began to take this approach everything flowed, we managed to achieve more and creative breakthroughs became more regular.

We have our ongoing Avebury project which so far consists of a feature film (Notes From A Journey), a shorter video work (Revisiting), several photo series and letters. We also have a book, installation and a performance in the pipeline but that is on hold at the moment for obvious reasons.

We also have an ongoing mail art project of letters which has currently become more important due to the fact that we are unable to see people in person, so we have been posting these out quite frequently. For us the internet is incredible but it is also important to continue to create something physical that can be touched, something we can send directly from our hands into the hands of the viewer.

An unexpected and exciting outcome of this enforced isolation is that we have finally started editing Plot Points, a feature film which we shot on the misty beaches of Portugal about two years ago but hadn’t had a chance to finish yet. We are currently using our time to focus on working through the hours of footage of that and slowly piecing it together.

The world has suddenly changed, it won’t quickly go back to normal after this and it would be very easy to get distracted and confused because it is such a turbulent and scary time but we need to all do what we can to stay safe and stay sane, find that part of ourselves which is constant and clear and stay connected to that. For us we can do this by spending time each day creating, some time outside, and some time dreaming.

Daniel & Clara’s portfolio →

Leah Clements

Leah Clements

What’s your background?

Art.

There’s a video of me at 10 years old where my Mum asks me “What are your favourite subjects at school?” (note the plural ‘subjects’) and I respond without smiling or blinking and looking very serious: “Art.”

I grew up in East London. I haven’t gone very far, but I did cross the river.

What influences you artistically?

Mostly the people around me, especially when they talk about experiences of emotional,
psychological and physical things that are difficult to explain or articulate.
The community of crip artists that I’ve found over the past couple of years have been a
big influence too, people like Romily Alice Walden, Lizzy Rose, Carolyn Lazard,
Johanna Hedva and loads more have been really important to me developing a crip
discourse for my practice, and to better advocate for my access needs when working as
an artist, and those of others.

The people I work with are incredibly important to the development of a piece or
project – whether that’s the DoP of a film, or someone I interview for research, my work
often involves a fair amount of collaboration with other people who massively impact on
the work.

The people in my life who have/continue to support me and my practice in general have
also of course influenced it. My partner George Woolfe listens and talks through all my
work with me while I’m making it, which definitely helps the work be the best it can
and do what I want it to do.

How do you start a new work?

I usually have loads of stuff that I want to make work about at any one time, and just
waiting until I have a chance to start making it. Often the first place I start is
researching the subject I’m interested in, and then I seek people out to talk to about it.
This is usually people who have a particular psychological, emotional &/or physical
experience that’s hard to describe, or just isn’t often talked about, and then I’ll often
interview them and make an audio recording. Beyond that though it varies quite a lot
what I do next. I might edit those recording into a film work, or develop them into a
performance, or make something else that’s sparked by them.

What are you working on right now?

I’m making a film work called ‘To Not Follow Under’, for which I spoke to a sleep
neurologist, a psychotherapist, and a rescue diver about the limits of care and empathy,
and where the cut-off point is. I’m filming in a sleep clinic, a swimming pool and a
hyperbaric chamber. It’s been commissioned by Science Gallery London and will be in
the show ‘ON EDGE: Living in an Age of Anxiety’, opening in September.

Leah Clements’s portfolio →